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24 Years After:Nigerians Remember Mysterious And Sudden Death Of Military Leader ,General Sani Abacha

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Late General Sani Abacha

 

On June 8th 1998 a Monday for that matter, the Nigeria’s military leader General Sani Abacha passed away inside the country’s seat of power Aso Rock Presidential Villa.

By then the social media was not existing, but before noon on that fateful Monday rumours about his death have circulated across the country.

Even foreign broadcast stations announced the death of the Nigeria’s helmsman based on speculation while awaiting the official announcement through radio NIgeria.

Finally before six PM the sign tune of radio Nigeria rented the airwaves and in a sympathetic tone the death of the head of Nigeria’s federal military government announcement was made.

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Nigerians from the North received his death with remorse but in Lagos and some south western states went in jubilation about the death of Nigerian leader.

June 8 1998: Why Announcement Of General Abacha’s Death Was Delayed
General Abacha’s rule which began from November 17th 1993 ended on June 8th, the day he went back to his creator.

But before his death, the country was thrown into confusion as it remains two month to the general elections when the country’s president was about to be elected and the Head of state happened to be the only candidate of the five political parties.

The political parties that presented General Sani Abacha for transforming from Soldiers uniform to civilian are the United Nigeria Congress Party UNCP, Democratic party of Nigeria DPN, National centre party of Nigeria NCPN, Grassroots Democratic Movement GDM and CNC .

General Sani Abacha was buried on the same day at night at his residence located at Gidado Road Nassarawa GRA Kano after his funeral prayers led by the late Chief Imam of Kano sheikh Idris kuliya Alkali.

The Provisional ruling council PRC sat after the death and appointed the chief of Defense staff General Abdulsalami Abubakar as the new Head of state and on June 9th he assumed office.

 

History

Brief History Of Modakeke

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Modakeke is a town in Osun State, South West Nigeria, with a population of close to three hundred thousand people.

The Modakekes are also known as the Akoraye and have a history of valor at war and are prosperous farmers.

With the fall of the Oyo Empire to the Fulani, the Yoruba kingdom was thrown into confusion and the inhabitants of the Old Oyo were dispersed and started new settlements all around Yoruba land.

Fleeing southwards in search of new abodes after the fall of the Oyo Empire, the Oyos started settling among the Ifes in 1834.

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As the Romans of old, they were soldier-farmers. They were hardy as soldiers and industrious as farmers.

Having lost all their possessions in their hasty flight, they started life in Ife by doing menial jobs to enable them eke out a living.

The reigning Ooni of Ife, Oba Akinmoyero was said to have received them well.

They started growing and producing different types of food crops on farmlands given to them by their hosts.

A good number of them got recruited into Ife’s weak army and it was through their gallantry that Ife had its territory extended to Alakowe, its present boundary with Ilesa.

Prior to the arrival of the Oyos, Ijesha land extended to the present location of the Palace of the Ooni of Ife.

This is why the Palace area is known as Enuwa (Enu Owa) until today.

Ooni Akinmoyero gave the displaced Oyo an expanse of land to stay outside the walls of Ife,the place given to the Modakekes was home to a species of bird called Ako (Stork), Hence the origin of the appellation AKORAYE(The stork has a place).

It was also customary for the storks at the location to chirp and sing the rhyme Mo-da-ke-ke-ke-ke which was most of the time heard by the Ifes and it was decided that the new settlement would be called MODAKEKE

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History of the Ajanakus Family in Ilesa, Osun State, Nigeria

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Early 19th Century: The Beginning
The Ajanakus family traces its roots back to the early 19th century in Ilesa, Osun State, Nigeria. The family’s progenitor, Pa Ajanaku, was known for his wisdom and leadership within the local community. He was a respected farmer and trader, contributing significantly to the agrarian economy of Ilesa.

Late 19th Century: Expansion and Influence

By the late 1800s, the Ajanaku family had expanded both in size and influence. Pa Ajanaku’s descendants continued his legacy, establishing themselves as prominent figures in agriculture and local commerce. The family became known for their cultivation of cocoa, a key cash crop in the region, which boosted their economic standing.

Early 20th Century: Community Leadership

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In the early 1900s, the Ajanaku family began to take on more formal leadership roles within Ilesa. Members of the family held various chieftaincy titles and were involved in the administration of the town. Their influence extended to education, as they were instrumental in the establishment of local schools, promoting literacy and learning in the community.

Mid-20th Century: Modernization and Political Involvement

The mid-20th century saw the Ajanaku family adapting to the changing political landscape of Nigeria. They played key roles during the colonial period and the struggle for independence. Family members were active in local and regional politics, advocating for the rights and development of the Ilesa community.

Late 20th Century: Economic Diversification

As Nigeria gained independence in 1960, the Ajanaku family diversified their economic activities. They ventured into various industries, including manufacturing and real estate. Their entrepreneurial spirit contributed to the economic growth of Ilesa and Osun State.

21st Century: Legacy and Continuity

Today, the Ajanaku family remains a pillar of the Ilesa community. They continue to uphold their legacy of leadership, community service, and economic contribution. The younger generation has embraced modern professions, including law, medicine, and technology, while still honoring the family’s historical roots in agriculture and commerce.

The Ajanakus’ enduring legacy in Ilesa is a testament to their resilience, adaptability, and commitment to their community, reflecting the broader historical and cultural evolution of Osun State and Nigeria as a whole.

 

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History

Margaret Walker: Trailblazing Poet, Scholar, and Activist

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Margaret Walker was born on July 7, 1915, in Birmingham, Alabama was a college student at the age of 15 when she begin writing poetry. She received a BA from Northwestern University in 1935 and an MA from the University of Iowa in 1940. In 1936 she joined the Federal Writers’ Project in Chicago, where she became friends with Richard Wright and joined his South Side Writers Group.

In 1941 Walker became the first African American poet to receive the Yale Younger Poets Prize, for her debut collection For My People (Yale University Press, 1942). She was also the author of the poetry collections This Is My Century: New and Collected Poems (University of Georgia Press, 1989), October Journey (Broadside Press, 1973), and Prophets for a New Day (Broadside Press, 1970).

Walker married Firnist Alexander in 1943, and together they had four children. In 1949 they moved to Mississippi, where she joined the faculty at Jackson State College. She returned to the University of Iowa for her doctoral studies and received a PhD in 1965. The following year, she published her dissertation as a novel, Jubilee (Houghton Mifflin, 1966).

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In 1968 Walker founded the Institute for the Study of the History, Life, and Culture of Black People at Jackson State College. As director of the institute, which was later renamed the Margaret Walker Center, she organized the 1971 National Evaluative Conference on Black Studies and the 1973 Phillis Wheatley Poetry Festival.

After Walker retired from teaching in 1979, she published On Being Female, Black, and Free (University of Tennessee Press, 1997), a collection of personal essays, and Richard Wright: Daemonic Genius (Warner Books, 1988), a work of nonfiction informed by her friendship with Wright. Margaret Walker died of cancer on November 30, 1998, in Jackson, Mississippi.

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